Calendar

Jan
28
Sat
Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation 1863 and the March on Washington 1963
Jan 28 – Mar 12 all-day

A traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, National Museum of American History and the American Library Association.

Feb
17
Fri
Purchased Lives
Feb 17 – Mar 31 all-day

Purchased Lives is a traveling exhibition from the Historic New Orleans Collection with support from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities. From the colonial period and into statehood, slavery was a ubiquitous element of everyday life in New Orleans and Louisiana—affecting all parts of the local community, economy, and culture. The official end of the international slave trade, marked by the signing into law of An Act to Prohibit the Importation of Slaves on the second day of March 1807, dramatically altered the way slaves were bought and sold in the United States of America. In New Orleans, this meant an increase in sales of slaves brought to the city from the Upper South, and eventually the establishment of the city as a primary hub of the domestic slave trade.

Mar
7
Tue
Lunchtime Lecture: In Their Own Voices: Student Demonstrators Who Changed History
Mar 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

In Their Own Voices: Student Demonstrators Who Changed History, a lunchtime panel discussion led by Dr. Rachel Emanuel.  Southern University students in the 1960’s were part of a movement that changed history. Hear what several of them feel about their actions then and their desire to pass the torch to new generations of history makers.

Mar
9
Thu
Lagniappe Dulcimer Society’s Annual Dulcimer Fete
Mar 9 – Mar 11 all-day
Mar
16
Thu
Lunchtime Lecture: Allendale Plantation Slave Community
Mar 16 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Lunchtime Lecture featuring Dr. Julie Rose, “Allendale Plantation Slave Community,” Colonel John T. Nolan established Westover Plantation in West Baton Rouge as early as the 1820’s, amassing acres of farmland and slaves who lived and labored in the cotton and sugarcane fields along the Mississippi River. By the 1850’s, William Nolan and Henry W. Allen purchased the plantation and divided it into Westover and Allendale Plantations. The fields were worked by more than 250 enslaved men and women who came primarily from Africa, Louisiana, Virginia, Mississippi, and Kentucky. Julie Rose will present the history of the Allendale Quarter’s enslaved community and share some of the enslaved families’ stories and legacies and explain their connection to Solomon Northup.

 

Mar
19
Sun
Film screening: 12 Years A Slave
Mar 19 @ 2:30 pm – 4:45 pm

Film screening: 12 Years A Slave, Based on a true story of one man’s fight for survival and freedom, this film tells the story of Solomon Northrop, a free black man from upstate New York who was abducted and sold into slavery. FREE. Rated R. Run Time, 2 hours, 14 minutes.

Mar
25
Sat
Frank Lloyd Wright Interiors
Mar 25 – Jun 4 all-day

Frank Lloyd Wright Interiors, an exhibition of high-quality reproduction drawings of interiors, furnishings, and household objects offers a view into Frank Lloyd Wright’s creative conception of the interior spaces of his houses. Every feature of the house—from the overall structure, to the interior, down to the smallest details and objects—was conceived by Wright from the beginning as a single idea. Added to this exhibition will be an addition of Louisiana Arts and Crafts: Newcomb Pottery, Ford Thomas furniture, and Sam Corso stained glass.

Greater Baton Rouge Regional National History Day Competition
Mar 25 all-day

National History Day Competition- The West Baton Rouge Museum will welcome judges, volunteers, teachers and middle and high school students from a twelve parish region to compete individually and in groups with projects including research papers, performances, websites, exhibits, and documentaries.  The theme for this year’s contest is “Taking A Stand in History.”

Mar
30
Thu
Lunchtime Lecture: Proofs of Purchase: Documenting Enslaved Ancestors
Mar 30 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Lunchtime Lecture, “Proofs of Purchase: Documenting Enslaved Ancestors” with genealogist, Jari Honora. This presentation offers a brief overview of genealogical research for African Americans in the post-Civil War period. The talk is focused primarily on tracing enslaved ancestors back through generations of captivity, including methods for identifying the last-known slave owners of African Americans in the antebellum period. Mr. Honora is a graduate of Tulane University and has over a decade of experience in historical and genealogical research including research for the PBS series, ”Finding Your Roots” and the Georgetown Slavery Project.

Apr
8
Sat
West Baton Rouge Talented Student Art Show
Apr 8 – May 21 all-day